ABOUT

Passionate about art, outdoor adventure, and world travel, I have lived chapters in the United States (California and Colorado) and Southern Germany, and regularly frequent Kentucky and England to visit family. There is much of the world I long to explore - and many ways by which I would like to do so.

I studied Kinesiology and History in college, and currently work as a high school Cross Country and Track & Field coach and substitute teacher, furthermore seizing any opportunity to share and/or grow my writing, music, and photography.

My desire for this site is to offer a gathering place for ideas and expression, especially those that might be considered at the margins of popular culture.

"Every great artist is a man who has freed himself . . . Every man who has shown the world the way to beauty, to true culture, has been a rebel, a "universal" without patriotism, without home, who has found his people everywhere."
Robert Henri (The Art Spirit)

"People may wonder why young men like to run distance races. What fun is it? Why all that hard, exhausting work? Where does it get you? Where's the good of it? It is one of those strange ironies of this strange life that those who work the hardest, who subject themselves to the strictest discipline, who give up certain pleasurable things in order to achieve a goal, are the happiest men. When you see 20 or 30 men line up for a distance race in some meet, don't pity them, don't feel sorry for them. Better envy them instead. You are probably looking at the 20 or 30 best "bon vivants" in the world. They are completely and joyously happy in their simple tastes, their strong and well-conditioned bodies, and with the thrill of whole-some competition before them. These are the days of their youth when you can run without weariness; these are their bouyant, golden days, and they are running because they love it. Their lives are fuller because of this competition and their memories will be far richer. That's why men love to run. There is something clean and noble about it."
Brutus Hamilton, Track & Field coach 1924-1965

"At any minute it is what we are and are doing, not what we plan to be and do that counts."
J.R.R. Tolkien (The Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien)